Herbert Matthews and Goldie Reeder

For the early life of Goldie, see this post.

After Herbert’s mother died, he left home and took various odd jobs in Chicago.  He had a wide variety of jobs (see his autobiography) – traveled on trains, worked for Barnum and Bailey Circus, did odd jobs in Indianapolis, etc.  He worked on a British ship and sailed around the world.  One of his buddies on the ship was Jim Hanna.  After the trip, Jim and Herbert went to Indianapolis where Herbert’s father and step-mother were living.  Jim Hanna met Laurinda (Renie) Hatcher.  She was Goldie’s great aunt (Amanda Cozatt’s sister).  Amanda was Nettie’s mother.  Jim and Renie later married.  Herbert met Goldie at Aunt Renie’s house.

Young Goldie and Herbert Matthews

They were married on January 6,  1916 in Indianapolis.

INDIANAPOLIS NEWS – JAN. 7, 1916, p4.   Marriage License:  Herbert L. Matthews and Goldie Reeder

Newman’s daughter Iva married John Wickliff Denton in Indianapolis on June 1, 1916.

Herbert had passed the Civil Service examination on Oct. 2, 1915, and was notified by mail on April 12, 1916.  He sent his medical certificate on Oct. 8.  He was appointed as substitute clerk Nov. 25, went to work on Dec. 5 at 5:59 pm at the Indianapolis, getting a his first paychecks on Dec. 18th of $11.78, and Jan. 3, 1917 of $28.10.

He took a leave from there and entered the Navy in October 1917 for service in WW1.

Goldie and Herbert Matthews, as Herbert entered WW I service
Herbert Matthews left the postal service for WW I. The Indianapolis Star, November 14, 1917.

After the war, Herbert went back to the post office but remained in the Naval Reserve.

Their first child, James Douglas, was born at 10:00 am on Friday, February 7, 1919 at their residence at 717 E. 11th Street in Indianapolis.

In the 1920 census Newman (65) and Helen (52)  were living at 1036 N. King Avenue on the west side of Indianapolis with daughters Nellie R. (20, a typist), and Bernice E. (15), and a 13 month old boarder, Adolph Milharsie.  All had been born in Illinois but the baby (1 1/12), born in Indiana. Iva (23) and her husband, John Denton (34), were living in Indianapolis with son Glenn (15 mo.), and a Sybil Trosky (47), probably a boarder.  Mable (32) and her husband, Fred Reeder (32), were living in Posey County, Indiana.

In the 1920 census, Herbert L. Matthews (30, a postal clerk) and wife Goldie (22) were living with son James D. (11/12 months) at 450 N. Senate Avenue.

Their second child, Mary Luella, was born at 12:00 noon on Friday, May 28, 1920, at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Indianapolis.  Anna Louise was born at 11:00 pm on Thursday, February 16, 1922 at Methodist Hospital.

Newman lived at 537 North Capital where daughter Betty walked to Manual High School.

Glenn Denton, Newman Matthews; c. 1921

Daughter Nellie married Ralph Sidney Cox in Marion County, Indiana on August 19, 1922. They remained in Indianapolis, and were living at 340 N. Hamilton when Newman died on January 25, 1923 of cancer of the pancreas and chronic intestinal nephritis.  His age was 68y7m28d.   He was buried in the Mackinaw Cemetery, Mackinaw, Illinois.

Newman Matthews Obituary, The Pantagraph (Bloomington, IL), Jan 26, 1923.

CLINTON ILLINOIS NEWSPAPER OBITUARY

N. H. MATTHEWS IS SUMMONED

N. H. Matthews, a former resident of Clinton and brother of C. H. Matthews, 403 East Main street, passed away at his home in Indianapolis, Ind., this morning at 2:30 o’clock, following an illness of several months.  He was 69 years old.

Newman Matthews was born in Mackinaw, Illinois in 1853.  For several years he lived in Clinton, having been a tinner.  At one time he was in business here, selling out to Herman Metz.  He was married to Miss Anna Swanson in 1887, who preceded him in death fifteen years ago.  He was married a second time and this wife and seven children survive.  They are Mrs. Fred Reeder, Mrs. Nellie Cox, Mrs. Iva [Denton], Herbert, Ralph, and Bernice of Indianapolis, Ind., and Carl, of Ann Arbor, Mich.  He also leaves two brothers and a sister, C. H. Matthews of Clinton; G. L. Matthews of Champaign, and Mrs. B. F. Spencer, of Clinton.  The funeral services and burial will be held at Mackinaw Saturday.

 

INDIANAPOLIS NEWS – JAN. 25, 1923, p24

OBITUARY – Matthews, N. H., 340 N. Hamilton Ave., passed away Thursday morning, January 25, at the Methodist Hospital.  Mr. Matthews was formerly in the radiator repair business at 142 W. 10th.  Funeral services at the Ragsdale & Price Parlors, 1219 W. Alabama 2:30 p.m., Friday, January 26.  Friends invited.  Burial at Mackinaw, Ill. Saturday afternoon.

Newman’s brother, Charles Holmes Matthews, died in Clinton, Illinois on September 21, 1926.  His wife Mary died on May 5, 1949.  Their son Solomon had died in 1910.  All were buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery.

Stanley Edwards was born at 9:30 am on Thursday, May 17, 1923 at Deaconess Hospital.  Herbert Leslie, Jr., was born at 4:00 pm on Saturday, December 20, 1924 at Deaconess Hospital.

Herbert and Goldie Matthews, and their children left to right: Stan (baby), Jim, Anne, Mary

In April of 1927, for a postal promotional event, Herbert painted 3 foot postcards.

Three foot post cards. The Indianapolis Star, April 5, 1927.
Herbert Matthews (right)

Goldie, Betty, Jim, Herb “Les”, Anne, Mary, StanBetty Jean was born at 11:45 pm on Thursday, September 12, 1929 at their residence at 2837 N. Olney in Indianapolis.

Herbert and Goldie Matthews and their children. Back: Jim, Anne, Mary. Front: Betty, Herb, Stan

Son Jim also remembers the family living near the present site of the Masonic Temple.

 

In 1930, Herbert, Goldie, and family moved to New Philadelphia east of Indianapolis on US 40.  They moved there so they could have a garden and cow, as this was the worst of the depression.  Carl Eugene was born there at 2:30 pm on Tuesday, September 8, 1931.

Jim Matthews, Buster; 25th Street Indianapolis; c. 1924-1925

In July 2003 Anne Matthews Dillane provided the following story for the Matthews reunion:

“This is an early childhood memory while we were living in Philly Indiana. One evening, Dad decided to take the family into town to see a movie. We all piled into our old Nash and drove the 20+ miles to the big city. Upon arriving, to our surprise we had an extra passenger, Buster, our faithful little dog!! He had ridden all the way with us, lying between the hood and running board of the car. Dad put him in one of the rooms at the post office where he worked while we were at the show. Of course, coming home he had a less airy ride and many loving laps to lay on!!”

They lived there until 1934 and then moved back to Indianapolis and rented a house at 405 N. Beville.  Their last child, Ethel May, was born in the Deaconess Hospital in Indianapolis on September 4, 1934.

Herbert, Stan, Mary, Carl, Anne, Betty, Herb “Les”, Goldie, Ethel; Taken at 414 Beville, looking at the back of 410 Beville

After about a year they moved up the street to 414 N. Beville.  In 1937 they bought the house at 410 N. Beville.

Margaret “Jeanne” Reeder, Mabel (Matthews) Reeder, Janet Cox (Nellie’s daughter), Nellie (Matthews) Cox, Helen (Kilby) Matthews, Iva (Matthews) Denton

Helen Kilby, Newman’s wife, died in September 1940.

Helen Kilby Obituary, The Pantagraph (Bloomington, IL), Sep 21, 1940

OBITUARY – MACKINAW, ILLINOIS

Mrs. Helen Kilby Matthews, daughter of N. L. and Margaret Allensworth Kilby, was born on the Kilby homestead south of Mackinaw June 6, 1867, and died at 2:55 pm Friday [Sep 20, 1940] at the Illinois Christian Home in Jacksonville.  She was married to Newman Matthews of Indianapolis, Indiana, at Mackinaw in September, 1913.  They made their home in Indianapolis, where Mr. Matthews preceded her in death several years ago.  After his death she returned to this community to make her home until 1938 when she entered the Christian Home for the Aged at Jacksonville.

She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Inez Bollan of Havanna, onr brother, O. B. Kilby of Mackinaw; two step-sons and four step-daughters, Herbert and Ralph Matthews, Mrs. Mabel Reeder, Mrs. Iva Denton, Mrs. Nellie Cox, and Mrs. Bernice Blase, all of Indianapolis.  There are also several step-grandchildren and a host of friends in the Mackinaw community.  Funeral services were held in the Christian home at 2:30 pm Sunday, in charge of the Reverend M. L. Pontius of Jacksonville.  Burial was in the cemetery at the Home.  Pallbearers were Glenn Kilby of Virginia, Alvin Trimble of Hopedale, Warren Trimble of Pekin, Francis Kilby of Mackinaw, Glen Denton and Mr. Blase of Indianapolis.

In 1942, Herbert was called up to serve in WW II, but was sent home after breaking his shoulder in Canada.

Herbert Matthews, WW II

Herbert was an active member of several lodges, including the Masonic Lodge, the Scottish Rite, the Murat Shrine, and the Queen Esther Chapter of the eastern Star. He was very social and enjoyed the activities. Goldie was very reserved and tolerated them.

On right, Goldie and Herbert Matthews
On right, Goldie and Herbert Matthews
On right, Herbert Matthews, unknown man, Goldie Matthews

In 1962 Herbert was installed as the vice-president of the National Association of Retired Civil Employees. In 1963 he was installed as president. His chapter had over 400 members.

Herbert Matthews installed as president. The Indianapolis Star, January 1, 1963.
Herbert Matthews

Herbert was a friendly, fun-loving man, who enjoyed being the life of the party.

Herbert Matthews

Herbert and Goldie lived at 410 N. Beville when Herbert died on September 11, 1965 in the Veterans Hospital in Indianapolis due to a failing heart caused by emphysema.  His age was 76y1m4d.

Herbert Matthews obituary. The Indianapolis Star, September 12, 1965.

INDIANAPOLIS NEWS – SEP. 13, 1965, p17.

OBITUARY – Rites for Herbert L. Matthews, 76, 410 N. Beville, will be at 10 a.m. tomorrow in the Flanner & Buchanan Fall Creek Mortuary.  Matthews was a retired postal clerk.  He died yesterday at the 10th Street Veterans Hospital.  He was a member of East Park Methodist Church, Capital City Masonic Lodge, the Scottish Rite, and Murat Shrine.

Goldie lived at 410 N. Beville a few more years, then sold the home and rented a double in the 2300 block of North Elizabeth Street on the east side of Indianapolis.  A few years later she rented a small house at 129 N. 2nd Avenue in Beech Grove.  When her health started to deteriorate, she moved into Crestwood Village South Apartments.  She died in the Hospice at Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis on April 23, 1981 of breast cancer.

Goldie Matthews obit, The Indianapolis Star, April 30, 1981.

Herbert and Goldie were buried in the Washington Park East Cemetery in Indianapolis.

Lee Reeder and Nettie Turner

Continued from Joseph Reeder and Christina Condon post.

Goldie May was born to Lee Reeder (age 28) and Nettie Turner (age 31) on March 1, 1897.

Lee (age ~29) and Nettie (age 31) were married July 12, 1897 in Montgomery County, Ohio. Lee used his middle name James on the marriage license probably because he was still legally married to Martha “Mattie” Parks.

On December 20, 1898, Wilson S. Bowers posted a $500 bond (equal to $14,700 in 2014) to the court and was appointed guardian of Malinda (age 15) and John F (age 17) Reeder. On January 12, 1899, Wilson S. Bowers was granted a pension for being the guardian of Malinda A. ‘Addie’ Reeder.

On 1/17/1899, Gardner Condon died. He was the last surviving grandparent of Joseph and Christina’s children.

Lee was an alcoholic and Nettie lived a miserable life with him.  They were living in Dayton, Ohio from 1898 through 1905. Claudine was born to Lee (age 30) and Nettie (age 33) on May 6, 1899.

On April 9, 1900, Lizzie (age 27) married her second husband, James H Hursey (age 46) in McLean County, IL. This was the second marriage for James Hursey as well. In September 1895, James sued his former wife for divorce on the grounds of desertion and was granted a divorce.

In the 1900 Census, Lizzie (age 27) and James Hursey (age 46) were boarding with Roscoe Patchett (age 4) in the home of William Hursey (age 73) and his wife Sidney (age 72), likely parents of James. James’ occupation was a house painter. After this time, James must have adopted Roscoe Patchett because after this time Roscoe was known as Roscoe Hursey. Interestingly, living next door was the widow, Dorothea Shiner (age 66), the mother of Charles Shiner, future husband of Addie. Dorothea’s husband, Jacob, had died in 1888.

In the 1900 census, Lee (31) was living on 3rd Street in Dayton, Ohio with his wife Nettie (34), and children Otto E. (16), Nova (12), Goldie (3), and Claudine (1).  Otto and Nova had been born in Indiana, all others in Ohio.

Meanwhile, Lee Reeder’s sister Lillie (25) was living in Bloomington, Illinois at 1102 West Clay Street with her husband Earl Cox (28) and their daughters June (13), and Hazel (6).

Also in the 1900 census (June 1, 1900), Nova Davis (John and Nettie’s daughter, age 12) was boarding with a farmer, Chancy (sp?) Wallace (age 40) and his wife Alice (age 39) in Bethel Township, Clark County, OH. Nova was probably visiting at the time.

In the 1900 census, Lizzie’s first husband, Isaac ‘Elmer’ Patchett (age 34) was living with his parents, Alan and Nancy, in Greenville, OH. He is listed as divorced, having been married for 9 years (presumably to Lizzie) with no children, and now with an occupation of hostler (looking after the horses of people staying at an Inn). A 32 year old female boarder, Haas Libbie, was also living with them. She’s listed as currently married for 13 years with 1 child. She has no occupation.

On September 27, 1901, Addie Reeder (age 18) married John Thomas Wagner (age 21) of Ft. Recovery, OH in Mercer County, OH. On the marriage license, Addie’s occupation was listed as music teacher. In the 1900 Census, John (age 19) was living with his parents and his occupation was listed as ‘laborer in factory’.

In 1904, Pearl was born to Lee (age 35) and Nettie (age 38) in Dayton, Ohio.

On February 4, 1904, James Gardner (age 24) married a widow, Pearl Lowders (age 24), in Darke County, OH. Pearl was the daughter of George Eliker and Eliza Hershey. James’ occupation was listed as clerking.

On June 22, 1905 Otto (age 21) enlisted in the 2nd US Infantry. On his enlistment entry, he was listed as having blue eyes, black hair, height of 5’ 11′, and a dark complexion.

On April 18, 1906, Nova Davis (age 18) married Tony Urick (age 29) in Hamilton County, OH. This was Nova’s first marriage and Tony’s second (divorced). Tony was a finisher and Nova was a waitress.

In the fall of 1906, Lee (age 38) and Nettie (age 41) moved to Hartford City, Indiana, where Lee worked at a nitroglycerine plant.  Nettie died there on January 8, 1907 at the age of 40y11m20d.

HARTFORD CITY DAILY TIMES-GAZETTE;  Wednesday, January 9, 1907

Mrs. Lee Reeder, 40 years old, died Tuesday night about eight o’clock at the Reeder home on [77] West Commercial Street of consumption [tuberculosis].  The deceased is survived by a husband and three small children.  The family has lived here only about three months.  They came here from Dayton, Ohio, Mr. Reeder having obtained employment at the nitroglycerine plant north of the city.  The arrangements have not been made known.

 

HARTFORD CITY DAILY TIMES-GAZETTE; Saturday, January 12, 1907

The funeral of Mrs. Lee Reeder of West Commercial Street was held at the house Friday morning and burial was made.  Mrs. Reeder died Tuesday of consumption.

Novie Davis lived with Nettie and Lee Reeder off and on.  She did not get along with her step father Lee.  Novie was married when her mother died on January 8, 1907.  She lived in Shelbyville most of her life and had one daughter, Bertha (Pope), and two sons, Frank and Kenneth Urick.

On January 11, the county buried Nettie in the Hartford City IOOF Cemetery.  The day Nettie died, Lee put Goldie (~10) and Claudine (age 7) in a private foster home of 6-7 children run by an older couple.

The Evening News Hartford City, Indiana Saturday, 12 January 1907 Page 1, Column 5

Mother dies and father is unable to care for them.

Turned over to the Board of guardians

In the Circuit Court Saturday morning Levi Reeder willingly consented to having his three children committed to the Board of guardians and the three little ones are now being cared for at the county home, northwest of the city.

Mrs. Reeder died this week after a long illness consumption leaving her three children to be cared for by their father, who found themselves unable to do so and he was then obliged to ask assistance of the court. The children are Golda, age 10; Claudine, age 8; Pearl, age 3. The Reeder family came to Hartford City three months ago from Dayton, Ohio and had lived on W. Commercial St. The father is employed at the nitroglycerin plant.

On January 14, 1907 Pearl (age 2) was placed with George and Alice Claycomb (Nettie’s sister) and their children Glenn (age 14) and Lawrence (age 12) in Hartford City, Indiana. On the application, George’s occupation was listed as ‘oil pumper’. Alice and the foster home were told by the court that Lee was not to take the girls.

Goldie and Claudine stayed in the foster home only a few months.  Their father’s sister, Lillie Cox, and possibly another sister, Lizzie Hursey took them out to find homes for them.  They lived in Hudson, Illinois, and Lillie had five children of her own.

In March, Lee took Pearl from George and Alice Claycomb (Nettie’s half-sister) to live with Mary Reese, whom he would marry later that year. Mary raised Pearl. (Note: Fred’s write-up said Lee never came to get her there, but he continued to be married to Mary until their deaths in 1930.)

Board of State Charities

Indianapolis, IN

Date of visit May 28, 1907

Report of Pearl Reeder

Ward of Backford County

Placed with Alice and Geo. Claycomb, an oil pumper residing 6 miles N.E. of Upland, IN in Grant County.

The child was born -04, placed in this home 1-14-07.

Remarks: This child’s father took her from Mrs. Claycomb, who is its aunt, in March ostensibly for visiting relatives in Illinois, promising to return it, but they have never heard a word from him since. She does not know the name of the place in Illinois.

Leila M. Thomas

State Agent

In a drunken state, Lee got into a fight with the man he was boarding with and as result, the man died. Note that Lee was not living with Mary and Pearl at this time.

The Dayton Herald, Dayton, Ohio, Friday, 02 Aug 1907, page 4, column 7.

MURDER CHARGE MADE

Police searching for James Reeder, who beat Benjamin Davis with chair.

Victim dies at St. Elizabeth’s.

The police are making a diligent search throughout the city for James Reeder, a junk collector, who inflicted such injuries on Benjamin Davis Monday evening as caused his death at the St. Elizabeth Hospital yesterday. Reader had been boarding at the Davis home in Arlington Heights near the Soldiers Home and came to the house in the evening under the influence of liquor, after having been discharged by his employer, M. Ostrow.

He was reprimanded by Mrs. Davis and in return began to abuse her. Her husband took her part, and also gave the drunken man a severe scolding. A quarrel followed, which ended by Reeder striking Davis with a chair four times. He then made his escape, and has not been located since.

Ribs penetrated lungs

A postmortem examination held at the hospital by Dr.’s Light and Grey show that two ribs have been fractured, and had penetrated the lungs, causing death. Coroner Schuater has had charge of the case. None of the facts in the case developed until the death of the man and he died without making a statement of any kind. Mrs. Davis told the corner that all the trouble arose over Reeder being drunk.

The dead man was 51 years old, and leaves two children and a wife.

The police are doing all in their power to locate the assailant but have been unable to do so as yet.

 

The Dayton Daily News, Dayton, Ohio, Friday, 02 Aug 1907, page 11, column 1-2.

NO TRACE OF REEDER

Efforts of police to locate a legislator of Benjamin Davis unsuccessful so far – relative promises to aid in capture.

The police and the County officials are leaving no stone unturned to locate James Reeder, wanted for the murder of Benjamin Davis, the story of which was detailed exclusively in the Daily News Thursday.

Several arrests have been made of men whom the police thought might know of Reeder’s whereabouts, but in each instance the parties professed ignorance of his whereabouts. A relative of Reeder’s was apprehended by Detective Tobias shortly after noon Friday and taken to headquarters. He says he does not know where Reeder is, and that he has been looking for him and will turn him over to the police and the event he can locate him.

Corner Schuster’s postmortem examination of the body of Davis shows that death was due to the breaking of two ribs, which punctured lungs. This the family of the dead man say was caused when Reeder struck Davis with a chair last Monday night. The attending physician realized the condition of the man as a most serious one, and on Tuesday ordered him to the hospital. He died there Thursday morning without making a statement as to the fight.

The family testified before the corner, as stated Thursday, that Reeder was employed by M. Ostrow, a junk dealer, collecting junk for him, but was discharged last Monday. He was boarding with the Davis family and after being discharged became intoxicated, went to the house at Arlington Heights and abused the family, striking Davis with a chair. He left immediately and the police are now hunting diligently for him.

Davis is survived by a widow and two children. The arrangements for the funeral have not been completed. The body is still at Reisinger and Hibbler’s morgue and will probably be buried Saturday morning. Reeder has three children, small girls. His wife is dead.

 

The Dayton Daily Journal, Dayton, Ohio, Friday, 02 Aug 1907, page 5, column 5-6.

UNREADABLE

 

The Dayton Daily News, Dayton, Ohio, Saturday, 03 Aug 1907, page 9, column 3.

SURRENDERS TO POLICE

Levi Reeder admits inflicting injuries that caused the death of Benjamin Davis, but pleads self-defense

Knowing that he was a fugitive from justice and that a charge of manslaughter would be placed against him, and yet not fearing to face that charge, Levi Reeder appeared at police headquarters Friday night and surrendered himself to the police.

Reeder is the man who, on last Monday night struck Benjamin Davis of Arlington Heights about the body and head with a chair, inflicting injuries which resulted in the death of Davis Thursday morning. The police made a search for Reeder but he could not be found. His whereabouts were unknown until he came into headquarters Friday and told where he had been in gave his version of the story.

He stated that he went to the Davis home on Monday evening, where he had been boarding, and he found Davis in an intoxicated condition. He states that Davis was abusing his family and that he started in to abuse him. He says Davis drew a knife and was attempting to plunge it into him when he picked up a chair and struck him with it several times. Then he says he left the place and went to the home of some friends in the country, being out of work, and remained there until he learned that Davis was dead. He immediately started for the city with the determination to give himself up to the police.

Reeder’s story was taken and then he was locked up in the station house on a charge of manslaughter. He will be arraigned on that charge on Monday morning. Reader is a middle-aged man and has three small children living. His wife is dead.

 

The Dayton Daily Journal, Dayton, Ohio, Saturday, 03 Aug 1907, page 11, column 3.

REEDER GIVES HIMSELF TO THE POLICE

Man who killed Davis and fight is now locked in station house.

Claims he acted in self-defense.

Levi leader calmly walked into police headquarters and gave himself up to Lieut. Walsh. Leader is the man the local department have been looking for since last Monday when he had a fight with Benjamin Davis, hitting the latter over the head and body with a chair, and inflicting wounds about and that resulted in his death.

After Reeder had told the lieutenant who he was, he said that he went to his boarding place, which is the residence of his victim, and found Davis in an intoxicated condition. He claims that Davis was creating a disturbance about the house and when he (Reeder) called Davis down, Davis produced a long knife and attempted to kill him. Reader, according to his own statement, had to defend himself and picked up a chair, with which he hit his antagonist several times, which caused death.

Reader is a middle-aged man and had a child living with him. It is also claimed that he has two other children living in Bloomington, Illinois. Immediately after the fight he says he went to the country, and has been there until last night, when he came back for the sole purpose of giving himself up. His victim was about 51 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.

Reader is left to the police station awaiting his hearing. He is charged with manslaughter.

 

The Dayton Herald, Dayton, Ohio, Saturday, 03 Aug 1907, page 2, column 6.

REEDER READY TO STAND TRIAL

Levi Reeder, a man who struck Benjamin Davis with a chair during a fight last Monday inflicting injuries which caused his death Thursday and who had been hunted throughout the city the past two days without success calmly walked into police headquarters Friday evening and gave himself up. He claims the building was in self-defense, saying that he, Davis, was drunk when he came home. Later claims that he {?} him and a quarrel started. Davis drew a knife, according to Reeder, and he then used the chair in self-defense.

He told the police that he had been in the country since Monday and that he came to the city for the sole purpose of surrendering. It is now locked up in the station house with a charge of manslaughter standing against him. He will likely be removed to the jail for safekeeping. He has a child living here and two others in Bloomington, Illinois.

 

The Dayton Daily News, Dayton, Ohio, Monday, 05 Aug 1907, page 10, column 3.

MURDER IS THE CHARGE

Placed against friendlier by the widow of Benjamin Davis, whose death resulted from by injuries.

Mrs. Benjamin Davis, widow of Benjamin Davis, who died last Thursday morning from the effects of being struck by a chair in the hands of Frank reader, came to the city from her home in Arlington Heights Monday morning and swore out a warrant against reader, charging him with murder.

The fight, in which Davis received the injuries that later resulted in this death, occurred at the Davis home in Arlington Heights, near the Soldiers Home, last Monday. Reeder escaped but gave himself up to police Friday, claiming that he did not know that Davis was so badly injured and that he came to the city from a farm where he had been working as soon as he learned Davis was dead. He was locked up.

He states that the fight started when Davis came home drunk and started to abuse his wife. He was boarding at the place. Davis made a statement before death, however, that it was Reeder who came home drunk after losing his position and insulted Mrs. Davis and then struck him with a chair in the back and head, breaking two ribs which penetrated the lungs, causing death.

The case will come to trial in Magistrate Terry’s court, having occurred outside the city limits.

 

The Dayton Daily News, Dayton, Ohio, Monday, 05 Aug 1907, page 10, column 4.

GOODLY ARRAY IN POLICE COURT

The trial of Levi Reeder, charged with manslaughter, was set for Tuesday.

 

The Dayton Herald, Dayton, Ohio, Tuesday, 06 Aug 1907, page 7, column 1.

MAN CHARGED WITH MURDER

Mrs. Benjamin Davis of New Arlington Heights whose husband died from the effects of being struck by a chair in the hands of Frank Reeder today swore out a warrant for Reeder’s arrest on a charge of murder. Davis and Reeder became involved in a fight at the former;’s home last Monday. Reeder escaped but gave himself up to the police as soon as he learned Davis was dead. The case will be tried before Magistrate Terry.

 

The Dayton Daily News, Dayton, Ohio, Wednesday 07 Aug 1907, page 9, column 3.

FRANK REEDER TO BE ARRAIGNED THURSDAY

The hearing of Frank Reeder, now in the county jail, charged with man-slaughter for the killing of Benjamin Davis, will be held Thursday morning at 9 o’clock at Squire Holderman’s office.

 

The Greenville Journal, Greenville, Ohio, Thursday, 08 Aug 1907, page 3, column 7.

Fight costs him his life.

Dayton Ohio – Benjamin Davis had a fight with James Reeder here. Reader worth the Davis and the latter died at the hospital from his injuries. Davis had two ribs broken, his head In several places and internal injuries. Reader was arrested on the charge of murder.

On October 31, 1907, Lee (age 39) married Mary E. Reese (age 50), a widow in Montgomery County, Ohio. His occupation at the time was listed as a teamster. His residence was listed as 324 May St. and her’s as 441 Chapel St.

Lee did visit with Goldie at the school house after she was taken away, but after that, he was never heard from again.

In March, Lillie provided he required periodic report on Goldie (age 11) who was living with her at the time.

March 12, 1908

To the board of state charities, Indianapolis Indiana

Dear Sir: the following answers to your printed questions constitute my report in regard to Goldie Reeder.

In what condition is the child's health? Good

How many months has the child attended school during the past year? Eight

What kind of progress has the child made at school? Just tolerably

Has the child attended church and Sunday school regularly? Yes

Is the child obedient? Yes

And industrious? Yes

What can you say of the child's moral conduct? Very good

How old is the child? 11 = March 12, 1908

On June 21, 1908 Otto was discharged from the US military (2nd US Infantry).

In June, Lillie provided the required periodic report on Claudine (age 9), who was living with her at the time.

June 27, 1908

To the board of state charities; Indianapolis, Indiana

Dear Sir: The following answers to your printed questions constitute my report in regard to Claudine Reeder.

In what condition is the child's health? Very good

Is the child obedient? Yes and industrious? Yes

What can you say of the child's moral conduct? Very good

How old is the child? 9 May 1908

Remarks: child was not properly cared for where she was for year and have brought her home now.

Mrs. Lillie Cox

My nearest railroad station is Hudson.
My PO address is Hudson.
I reside in the Township of Hudson. County of McLean, Illinois.
Yours truly, Mrs. Lillie Cox, guardian.

Date June 27, 1908

Lillie wrote a note to the authorities explaining the situation. At this time, Lillie placed Goldie (age 11) with Tom Inman and his family in Vandalia, IL.

June 27, 1908

Hudson, Illinois

Board of state charities,<p>

I will drop you a few lines as I want to explain a few things to you. One of the girls is staying with me at the present time or can until I get her a home. That is Claudine. She was staying with a family out here and they did not send her to school not very much nor to Sunday school and they didn't treat her well in no way. So I took her away from them and will try getting her a new home. But Goldie is now living in Vandalia, Ill. she just went there last week and I think has a good home. Well I will fill out their blanks the best I know how.

From Lillie B Cox
Hudson, Ill.
McClean Co.

In July 1908, Lillie Cox (Lee’s sister, Claudine’s aunt) took Claudine from her foster home where Claudine was being mistreated.

In July, Lillie responded to an inquiry about the status of the girls.

July 6, 1908
Hudson, Illinois

Board of charities,

Dear friends, I will answer your letter which came to hand a few days ago and will say I will be glad to give you any information you ask concerning the little girls. I would've liked to keep the girls with me but I find it impossible to do so. We have five children of our own and my husband works by the day this summer. So you see it is about all we can do to keep things agoing and I find it real hard to get the little girls homes. Goldie has a good home I think. I will give you her address or the folks she is living with. His name is Tom Inman, Arandalia, Ill., RR2 and Claudine is still with me but as soon as I find her a home I will write you. I can't tell you a thing about Pearl. Her father hasn't been at my home for over a year. The last I heard from her she was in Dayton, Ohio. Her father and I have no correspondence at all. I will be glad to answer any questions you ask me if I can.

Yours most respectfully,
Lillie B Cox
Hudson, Ill.
RR2

In August, Lillie wrote the authorities for permission to place Claudine with her father, Lee who had remarried (to Mary Reese, where Pearl was living).

August 3, 1908
Hudson, Ill.

Mary Carmichael

Dear friend,

I thought I would write you a few lines this morning concerning my nieces I have care of. I have a letter from Goldie and also from the lady she is living with and it seems as though this woman isn't satisfied with Goldie, but Goldie is well pleased with her home or at least that is what she writes me and I am afraid that this woman is not going to keep her and I have Claudine here with me yet it seems as though homes are awful scarce. I have tried awful hard to get the little girls homes but it is impossible for me to do so. My husband is not very stout, and he just works by the day to make a living and we have five children and none old enough to look out for themselves. So you see we have our hands full, and what I want to say was this will you give me full consent to let their father have them, he is married again and he is big and stout and I think he had ought to be the one to look after them. And I hear he is leading a better life, you know the bad can reform and I hope he does for his children’s sake anyway. He has never wrote to me for the children since he got married but he did want them before he was married but I knew he couldn't care for them then. But I know he would take them gladly now. I look at it this way, if you do let him have them and he don't do by them like he should then you know the authorities will see that they are cared for there in Dayton as well as in any place else. Of course strangers could take them to a home better than I could. Every time I speak of taking them to a home tears comes in their eyes and of course I couldn't stand that. You can write to any of my neighbors and they will tell you that I have done all I can for the girls. I will give you the names of any or all of them if you say so and they can tell you all about me, and so if you say so we will give their father another trial. That will take the responsibility off my shoulders.

Of course I want your full consent as I don't want to get in any trouble. I will enclose a stamp for an early reply.

Yours most respect,
Mrs. Lillie B Cox
Hudson, Ill.
McClain Co.
RR No. 1

In October, Lillie could not find homes for the girls, so she took them nearby to Bloomington, Illinois and put them in the Lucy Morgan Home for girls, run by a cruel woman who made the girls do hard work.

STATE OF ILLINOIS, County of McClean, ss.        
THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS,  Mrs. E. R. Morgan<p>

YOU ARE HEREBY AUTHORIZED to take forthwith into your charge and care Goldie May Reeder, aged 11 years March 12th, 1908, and Claudine Ruby Reeder, aged 9 years May 8th, 1908, who have been declared dependent girls and convey them to the Girls Industrial Home of McClean County, Illinois.  And of this warrant you are commanded to make due return to this Court after its execution.

Witness, my hand and seal of our said County Court at Bloomington,
This 10th day of October A.D. 1908
C. C. Hassler     Clerk,
By   C. W. Atkinson     Deputy.

On December 22, 1908, Otto (age 24) married Mabel Mathews (age 27) in Hamilton County, Ohio. Otto’s occupation was listed as ‘painter’.

In March 1909, Lillie responded to authorities that the girls had been taken to the Industrial Girls Home.

March 23
Hudson, Illinois

Sir,

In regard to the Reeder girls I will say they are not in my care anymore. I felt like I couldn't look after them any longer and they are now at the Girls Industrial Home in Bloomington. If you want any information you'll have to write to them. Will say they are at a good home and was well and hardy when I seen them last, couple of weeks ago.

Yours respectively,
Mrs. Lillie B Cox
Hudson, Ill.
RR1

Claudine was taken out at age 10 by a young couple, Joseph Rudin (age 27), and his wife of four years, Anne (age 23).  They lived and farmed on his father’s farm (location illegible), and also owned a farm in Texas.  They apparently wanted Claudine to baby-sit their 3-year old son and 10 month old daughter.

Application and agreement

I hereby apply to the board of managers of the Girls Industrial Home of McLean County, Illinois, to be given the custody and control of Claudine Reeder, a female child about 10 years old, or such other child as may, by the consent of said board, be selected. This application is made subject to the rules of said board, and the questions and answers hereto and to the attached contract, which contract I agree to execute before taking charge of said child, should this application be granted.

Questions to be answered by applicant

1. Full name and age of applicant: husband Joseph Rudin, age 27; wife Annie Rudin, age 23.

2. Of what country is applicant a native? US

3. Is applicant a citizen of the United States? Yes

4. How long married? 4 years

5. Give name of last two places of residence and length of residence at each place:   live at the same place the last 15 years

6. Any children? If so, how many, their ages and sex? 2 - Boy 3 yrs and 1 girl 10 months

7. What is applicants occupation? Farming

8. Does wife attend to household work in person? Yes

9. What, if any, property do you? I own a farm in Texas but live on my father's farm

10. Post office address Cissna Park Illinois

11. Residence Pigeon Grove Township, Iroquois County

12. How far to nearest school house? 60 rods

13. Do you believe in the Christian religion? Yes

14. Will you legally adopt a child? No

15. If not adopted, what financial aid will you give when the child is of legal age? I will give her fifty dollars.

16. Will you keep child until she is of legal age? Yes

17. If not, state for what time and for what kind of employment you wish to take girl.

18. References (not less than two): G R Stoller, M L Stoubus, Lewis F Friedinger, Lillian Bahr.

The answers to the above questions and all the representations and statements in this application are true in substance and in fact, and are assented to and signed by me.

Applicant: Joseph Rudin<p>
Applicant: Annie Rudin

In the 1910 census, Claudine (age 11) was a hired girl in the home of Joseph (age 27) and Anne (age 23) Rudin with their two girls, ages 8 and 1 year old baby. Joseph was  farmer.

Within a year, Goldie was taken out of the orphanage by a 64 year old retired farmer, Daniel Webster Spidle (born 10 Aug 1844 in Mechnicsberg, PA), and his wife, Eliza Caroline English (born July 1849 in Ohio), age 56.  Daniel and Eliza were married 23 Dec 1869 in Knox, ILL. They were from Atlanta, in the northeast corner of Logan County, the neighboring county southwest of McLean.  They also owned a 60 acre farm two miles east of Atlanta.  They had been married 40 years, and had a 25 year old married daughter Bertha.  Spidle stated on the application that he was taking her ‘Because I want a child to take in my home as a full member of the family.’

Daniel’s parents were John Spidle and Jane Brocker, both of Mechnicsberg, PA. Daniel was a civil war veteran, fighting for the 12th Regiment Illinois Infantry between October 27, 1864 and July 10, 1865. He was 5’ 6′ tall, with hazel eyes and light hair.

Application and agreement

I hereby apply to the board of managers of the Girls Industrial Home of McLean County, Illinois, to be given the custody and control of Goldie Reeder, a female child about 12 years old, or such other child as may, by the consent of said board, be selected. This application is made subject to the rules of said board, and the questions and answers hereto and to the attached contract, which contract I agree to execute before taking charge of said child, should this application be granted.

Questions to be answered by applicant

1. Full name and age of applicant: husband Daniel W Spidle, age 64; wife Eliza C Spidle, age 56.

2. Of what country is applicant a native? US of America

3. Is applicant a citizen of the United States? Yes

4. How long married? 40 years

5. Give name of last two places of residence and length of residence at each place: Eminence Iroquois Co., Ill. 17 years, in Atlanta, Ill. 6 years

6. Any children? If so, how many, their ages and sex? One daughter – 25 years – married

7. What is applicants occupation? Retired farmer

8. Does wife attend to household work in person? Yes

9. What, if any, property do you? House in Atlanta Illinois +60 acres farmland 2 miles east of Atlanta

10. Post office address Atlanta Illinois

11. Residence Atlanta Illinois

12. How far to nearest school house? Two blocks

13. Do you believe in the Christian religion? Yes

14. Will you legally adopt a child? No

15. If not adopted, what financial aid will you give when the child is of legal age? Can't say until I know child

16. Will you keep child until she is of legal age? Can't say

17. If not, state for what time and for what kind of employment you wish to take girl. I want a child to take in my home as a full member of the family.

18. References (not less than two): John Bevan, J. S. Curtis, Atlanta Illinois

The answers to the above questions and all the representations and statements in this application are true in substance and in fact, and are assented to and signed by me.

Applicant: Daniel W Spidle

In the 1910 census (April 16, 1910), James Hursey (age 56), his wife Lizzie (age 37), and Roscoe (age 14) were living in Bloomington, IL. This was James second marriage. James occupation was listed as the proprietor of a boarding house and there were 5 male boarders listed.

In the 1910 census (April 18, 1910), Lizzie’s first husband Isaac ‘Elmer’ Patchett (age 44) was still living with his mother, Nancy, in Greenville, OH. Nancy is listed as being a widow, and having 2 children, 1 still living. Living with them was a single, 55 year-old man John Cozatt, listed as Nancy’s brother. Elmer and John are listed as not having an occupation.

Goldie wasn’t found in the 1910 Census. Daniel Spidle and Eliza were living by themselves (April 20, 1910).

In the 1910 Census (May 3, 1910), Lee Reeder (age 41) and his wife Mary (age 52), along with Lee’s daughter Pearl (age 6) were boarding with four other boarders in the home of Theodore and Elizabeth Nils and their daughter, 8 year old Lucile Nils in Dayton, OH. Theodore was a molder in a foundry. Lee was a brick maker in a brickyard.

In the 1910 census (May 3, 1910), Lillie (35) and her husband Earl Franklin Cox (37) were farming in McLean Co.,  Hudson Twp., Illinois, with their five children, Ethel (15), Marie (13), Belle and Bess (both 10), and Earl F. (7).

In the 1910 census (May 5, 1910), Claudine (11) was still living with Joseph and Anne Rudin and their two daughters, Clarence (8) and Nettie (1), in Pigeon Grove, Iroquois County, IL.

On August 20, 1910, James Gardner Reeder married May King in Marion County, IN. It is unknown whether Pearl Lowder (married six years previously) died or they divorced.

Goldie’s stay apparently didn’t last long, and she was taken at age 13 by James H. Hursey of Bloomington, Illinois, the husband of her aunt, Lizzie Hursey.  James had a boarding house in Bloomington.

Goldie Reeder
Industrial Women’s Home
Indentured to James H. Hursey of Bloomington, ILL

Daniel Spidle died on December 9, 1927 and is buried in the Mountjoy Cemetery in Atlanta, ILL.

James L. Reeder, a laborer, was found in the Dayton, Ohio city directory in 1910, living at 721 E. 5th Street.  A James Reeder was also found in the 1911 directory living at 1118 East 5th Street.  He was not found after that.

On September 28, 1910, Charles Shiner (age 33), son of Jacob and Dorothea ‘Dorothy’ (Albaugh) Shiner, married Addie Reeder (age 27) in Bloomington, IL. Addie must have divorced John Thomas Wagner by this time. [John was still living in 1942 based on his WW II draft card.] Charles was the 9th child of 11 in Jacob and Dorothy’s family. Jacob and Dorothy married in 1853 shortly after Jacob’s return form the Mexican War. They came to McLean County, IL., by covered wagon and settled on a farm about 5 miles east of Hudson. James provided wood for fuel for the Illinois Central railroad and Normal University. Unusual for the time, Dorothy’s mother lived to 96 years, and her grandfather lived to 110 years.

Dayton Daily Journal, Dayton, Ohio, Friday, 11 Nov 1910, page 3, column 7.

Recovers from fracture; dies of consumption

Jameson V. Turner, aged and well-known resident, succumbs to ravages of tuberculosis at home of his son.

After recovering from a triple fracture of the leg, James V Turner, 73 years old, died at the residence of his son, William Turner, 531 S. College St., Thursday morning at 11 o’clock from tuberculosis.

Mr. Turner was a carpenter portrayed and was well-known in this city, and resided here for a number of years. Some time ago Mr. Turner was repairing roof, when he lost his balance and fell, breaking his leg in three places. He recovered from this only to fall a victim to the ravages of the dread disease.

Despite his advanced age, Mr. Turner was active and was always working at his trade. He is survived by seven children. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 11 o’clock from his late residence. Burial will be made in Woodland Cemetery.

 

Dayton Daily News, Dayton, Ohio, Friday, 11 Nov 1910, page 6, column 6.

James V Turner

The funeral of James V Turner, who died Thursday morning, will be held Saturday morning at 11 o’clock at the late residence, 531 South College St. Interment was made in Woodland Cemetery. Death resulted from a lingering malody which developed after Mr. Turner had received a triple fracture of the leg. He was injured by falling from a roof which he was engaged in repairing. It apparently recovered, but was attacked sometime later with the illness which carried him away. He leaves seven children.

 

Dayton Daily Journal, Dayton, Ohio, Saturday, 12 Nov 1910, page 15, column 6.

James V Turner

Saturday morning at 11 o’clock the funeral of James V’s Turner, who died Thursday morning, will be conducted from the residence of his son, William Turner, 531 South College St. The deceased was well known in the city and died from tuberculosis. Burial will be made in Woodland Cemetery.

 

Dayton Daily Journal, Dayton, Ohio, Sunday, 13 Nov 1910, page 11, column 3.

James V Turner

The funeral of James V Turner, who died Thursday morning, was held Saturday morning at a 11 o’clock from the residence of his son, William, 531 South College St. Burial was made in Woodland Cemetery.

In the 1913 Bloomington, Illinois City Directory, James H Hursey and Lizzie ran a boarding house at 813 E Washington. Roscoe was living wth them.

James H Hursey (age 61), husband of Lizzie Reeder (age 41) died of a stroke. He was a blacksmith, painter, and ran a boarding house.

The Pantagraph (Bloomington, Illinois) · Wed, Apr 8, 1914 · Page 6

Death of J.H. Hurley

J.H. Hurley died Tuesday afternoon at the family residence, 813 East Washington street, following a paralytic stroke, Monday afternoon. He was able to return to his home, but his condition grew worse during the night. A complication of Bright’s disease and paralysis, caused his death.

Deceased was born in Hudson, Feb. 2, 1853, and was 61 years of age. Deceased was married to Miss Elizabeth Patchett, on April 9, 1900, to this union there were no children. Mr. Hursey was a blacksmith by trade.

He is survived by a step-son, Roscoe Patchett, and wife besides these he leaves the following: George, a patrolman on the Bloomington Police force; Charles of Peoria; Mrs. Euri Blough, of Kansas, and Mary Houston, of this city. Deceased was a member of the Court of Honor. His death will come as a surprise to his many friends, and will be learned of with deep regret.

In 1914, Earl Franklin Cox (age 41) and Lillie (age 39) moved from Hudson, Illinois to Bloomington, Illinois where he operated a water power mill on the Mackinaw River.

Claudine was adopted by a German family named Funk and raised by them.  Goldie lived with her Aunt Lizzie until she was 18.  She then (early 1915) went to Indianapolis to stay with her Uncle Frank Turner, Nettie’s brother, until she found work.  Goldie took various housekeeper jobs and lived with the employers.  She was housekeeping for a Doctor and his family when she met Herbert Matthews in 1915.

Lizzie and Roscoe must have moved from Bloomington, IL to Dayton, OH in late 1915 or early 1916. In the 1915 Bloomington directory, only Roscoe is listed. Neither is listed in the 1915 Dayton directory. In the 1916 Dayton Directory, Lizzie (age 44) and Roscoe were living at 27 S Horton with Lizzie listed as a widow of James.

On Jan 6, 1916, Goldie (nearly 19 years old) married Herbert Matthews in Indianapolis, IN.

On July 23, 1918, Claudine (age 19) married Paul Richard Lawhorn (age 19) of Shelbyville, IN. Paul was an express driver.

In 1918, William Perry Reeder (age 41) was living with his sister, Lillie Cox at 815 East Front Street in Bloomington, IL. He was a farm laborer. He is described as medium height, slender build, with blue eyes and light colored hair. (WW I draft card)

In the 1920 census Lee “James” (age 51) and Mary (age 62) were living (likely boarding) at 183 E. Rich Street, Precinct C of Columbus, Ohio. Along with Mary and Lee at the same address were Henry Riley (age (82) and Henry Hultz (age 33). Lee was listed as a laborer in a junk shop.

In the 1920 census, Lizzie’s first husband, Elmer (age 54) was boarding with James Cozatt and his wife Phebe in Greenville, OH. Living with them was the elder widowed sister of Phebe, Maggie Douglas. Elmer’s occupation is listed as ‘day work’.

In the 1920 census of Dayton, OH, Lizzie (age 47) was listed as a widower (of husband Jim Hursey). Their son, Roscoe (age 23), was listed as a lathe worker at a brass factory. Lizzie was listed as a saleswoman at a delicatessen. If Roscoe was Lizzie’s child, she would have had him at age 24 in 1897.

In the 1920 census, Claudine (age 20) was married and living with her step-sister Nova Davis (age 32) and Nova’s husband Anthony Urick (age 42) and their children, Bertha (age 12), Frank (age 10), and Kenneth (age 4). Claudine’s son Paul Jr. (age 5 months), was also living with them. Anthony was working as a finisher at a furniture factory, and Nova was working as a launderer.

On October 21, 1922, Pearl (age 18) married Theodore R. Ewry (age 22) in Montgomery County, Ohio. Both were listed as being born in Dayton, Ohio. Theodore was listed as a ‘press-man’ and Pearl as a ‘binder’.

Otto lived with Uncle Frank Turner for a while. Otto drank denatured alcohol in Dayton, Ohio during prohibition and lost his sight.  He was put in a VA hospital in 1924. Otto was transferred to the Marion VA (Grant Co., Indiana) from the Dayton VA (Montgomery Co., Ohio) in 1925 as an invalid. He was blind and his diagnosis was bilateral almost total, probably toxic pyorrhea. His closest relative was listed as an uncle David Martin of 1500 W 9th St., Muncie, IN. He is listed as a resident of the U.S. VA Facility on the 1930 and 1940 U.S. Census, Center Township, Grant County, Indiana. He remained there until he died.

John P. Davis (Nettie’s first husband, and Nova’s father) died suddenly at age 64 in 1926.

1926 Obituaries from the Shelbyville Democrat Newspaper, Shelbyville, Indiana, complied by Paula Karmire, page 140.

August 11, 1926

John P.  Davis died suddenly

Intense heat thought to have caused heart attack that hastened death of man

John P Davis, 64 years old, well-known resident of the city, died very suddenly at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Helen Urich, 345 East Washington St., at 1:30 o’clock this afternoon. It was stated that Mr. Davis had been pulling sugar corn in a field near the city today and is thought to have been overcome with heat which brought on a heart attack resulting in death. Following the man’s death, Dr. G I Inlow, Shelbyville for a number of years coroner, was called.

Six Mr. Davis has been a resident of and had many friends who will regret to learn of his sudden death. He was one of the most ardent workers in the Vine Street M P Church and was a man of splendid character. Besides the daughter atoms only died, Mr. Davis is survived by one brother, Charles Davis, of Portland Indiana, and three sisters. One sister, Mrs. Fred Bain, resides at Portland and two sisters lives at Muncie.

For a number of years Mr. Davis was employed at the Indian Refining Company. He had apparently been in the best of health when he left his home this morning and it is thought that the intense heat might have caused the heart attack. When taken ill, the man was brought to his daughter’s home where he only lived for a short time after being stricken.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later by Platt and Murphy, funeral directors.

 

1926 Obituaries from the Shelbyville Republican, Shelbyville, Indiana, compiled by Charlene Hoff, page 113.

Thursday, August 12, 1926

Davis funeral to be Friday

Services will be held at 2 PM tomorrow at Vine Street MP Church.

Died suddenly Wednesday

Funeral services for John P Davis, a 64, whose death occurred suddenly at 1:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Helen Ulrich of this city, will be held at 2 PM Friday at the Vine St. Methodist Protestant church. The Rev. RE Crider, pastor of the church, will have charge of the services. Burial will be in Forest Hill Cemetery in charge of Platt and Murphy, funeral directors.

Mr. Davis suffered a sunstroke, while working in the field for George Ogden, east of the city. He was taken to the home of his daughter, where death occurred before medical aid could be obtained. The body of the deceased has been taken to the funeral home of Platt and Murphy on E. Washington St., where friends may call at any time after 6 o’clock this evening, until the time of the funeral services.

Born in Salem Indiana November 12, 1861, Mr. Davis was the son of Isaac and Mahaley Davis. He had resided in Shelbyville for a number of years. He was formerly employed by the Indian Refining Company and recently has been an employee of the Blanchard-Hamilton Furniture Company. He was a devoted member of the Vine St. Methodist Protestant Church.

Besides his daughter, Mr. Davis is survived by two brothers, Alonzo Davis of Richmond Indiana, and Charles Davis of Portland Indiana, and three sisters.

 

1926 Obituaries from the Shelbyville Republican, Shelbyville, Indiana, compiled by Charlene Hoff, page 111.

Wednesday, August 11, 1926

Sudden death occurs today

John P Davis dies suddenly at 1:30 PM at the home of daughter

Taken ill in the field

John P Davis, a 64, well-known resident of the city died suddenly at 1:30 o’clock today at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Helen Urich. Mr. Davis was taken suddenly ill while working in the field of George Ogden, east of the city. He was brought to the home of his daughter in this city where he died before medical aid could be obtained.

Mr. Davis had resided in this city for a number of years. He was formerly employed by the Indian Refining Company and recently has been in the employee of the Blanchard-Hamilton Furniture Company. He was a devoted member of the Pine St. Methodist Protestant Church.

Besides his daughter he is survived by one brother, Charles Davis and a sister, Mrs. Fred Bane, both of Portland Indiana, two sisters, residing at Muncie Indiana.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later by Platt and Murphy, funeral directors.

Lee (age 61) and Mary (age 72) died one day apart in March of 1930.

The Columbus Dispatch, Columbus, Ohio, Saturday, 08 Mar 1930, page 2, Column 4

REEDER – Mrs. Mary, aged 78, died suddenly Saturday at her home of paralysis. She had suffered a stroke of paralysis some time ago, a second stroke resulting in death. Survivors: Husband, James Reeder; one brother and one sister. The body is at the Egan-Ryan Chapel where services will be held Monday at 2 p.m. with burial in Union Cemetery.

 

The Columbus Dispatch, Columbus, Ohio, Monday, 10 Mar 1930, page 2-A, column 5.

Mr. and Mrs. James Reeder, ??? Kilbourne Street, will be buried side by side Tuesday in Mt. Union Cemetery.

Death had separated the aged couple but only for a few hours. Mrs. Mary Reeder, aged 72, died at 2 a.m. Saturday at her home. She had been suffering from paralysis. The husband died at 8 a.m. Sunday of a heart attack, at the age of 70.

Authorities have failed to locate any relatives in Columbus and are appealing to police at Chicago in an effort to find a son.

After making arrangements for his wide’s funeral at the Egan-Ryan Co., Reeder returned to his home and became suddenly ill. Neighbors found him unconscious Sunday morning and he was taken to St. Francis Hospital. Coroner Joseph Murphy pronounced death due to heart trouble.

Funeral services for the couple will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Egan-Ryan Chapel. Burial will be in Union Cemetery.

 

The Columbus Citizen, Columbus Ohio, Monday, 10 Mar 1930, page 12, column 1.

DIE ONE DAY APART

Double funeral Tuesday for aged man and wife

Double funeral services will be held for James Reeder, 70, and his wife, Mrs. Mary Reeder, 72, who died within a few hours of each other Saturday and Sunday. Reeder died of a heart disease at 8:30 a.m. Sunday as he was being taken to St. Francis Hospital in a police ambulance. His wife died Saturday of paralysis. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday in the Egan-Ryan Chapel, 403 E. Broad Street, with burial at Union Cemetery.

In the 1930 census of Montgomery County, OH, Roscoe Hursey (age 34), son of Lizzie’s second husband James Hursey, was listed as the head of the household and Lizzie (age 57) was living with him. Roscoe was listed as divorced and living on a farm. Roscoe’s occupation was a machinist in an electrical refrigeration plant.

In the 1930 census, Paul Lawhorn (age 31) and Claudine (age 31) were living in Richmond, IN with their two sons, Paul Jr. (age 10), and Cleo B. (age 8).

Evangelo ‘Van’ Roseland and Lizzie Reeder must have married in 1938. In the 1936 Dayton Directory, Van Roseland was listed as single and a waiter and living at 42 S Williams. Roscoe (James’ Hursey’s son) was married to a woman named Betty, lived at 2003 Preston, and was a group leader at 300 Taylor. Lizzie was not found in the Directory under Reeder, Patchett, or Hursey. In the 1937 Dayton Directory, Van and Elizabeth were listed as married and living at 47 S Williams. In the 1938 Dayton Directory, Van was listed as a cook at Riviera, Inc and Elizabeth was listed as a dishwasher at Ark Restaurant. In the 1939 Dayton Directory, Van and Lizzie were living in the same house and he was still a cook.

Isaac ‘Elmer’ Patchett (age 73), Lizzie’s first husband, died on Feb 25, 1939 (OH death index).

In the 1940 census, Roscoe Hursey (age 44) was living in Dayton, OH with his wife Betty (age 33) and Betty’s mother, May Oiwine. Roscoe is listed as a tool maker at the Electric Refrigeration Mfg. Co.

In the 1940 census, Paul Lawhorn (age 41) and Claudine (age 41) were still living in Richmond, IN with their two sons, Paul Jr. (age 20), and Cleo B. (age 18). Also living with them were their daughter-in-law Edna (age 17) and their grandson Leslie (age less than a year). Paul was a laborer at Harris Produce. Paul Jr. was working at a furniture company.

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

Sun, May 3, 1942

Cox-Carter Wedding Told

Mrs. Lillie B. Cox, 508 East Mulberry street, announces the marriage of her daughter, Martha Ellen, to J. Donald Carter, son of Mrs. Mary E. Carter, 814 East Locust street.

The double ring ceremony took place Dec. 26, 1941, in St. Louis, Mo.

Mrs. Carter has been affiliated with the adult education group and Mr. Carter is a former student at Illinois State Normal university.

The couple will make their home in Rock Island where Mr. Carter will be employed.

In the 1942, 1944, 1950, 1955, 1959 Dayton Directories, Roscoe Hursey (son of Lizzie’s second husband James Hursey) and a wife named Mildred were living at 2903 Preston. Roscoe was still a tool maker for Frigidaire Mfg Div.

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

Tue, Aug 4, 1942

Visits Sisters

Mrs. Van Rosalind (Lizzie) of Dayton, Ohio, formerly Mrs. Jim Hersey of Bloomington and Hudson, is visiting her sisters, Mrs. Lily Cox of 506 East Mulberry street and Mrs. Charles Shiner of Hudson.

 

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

The, Sep. 2, 1943

Pfc. Edward F. Cox, who has been visiting his mother, Mrs. Lillie B. Cox, 508 East Mulberry street, has returned to his station at Camp Gordon, Augusta, Ga. He is stationed with the field artillery.

On Friday, November 19, 1943, Lillie B. Cox was admitted to St. Joseph’s hospital.

On November 28, 1943, Lillie Reeder Cox (age 69) died at St. Joseph’s hospital. In her obituary it says she and Earl had 7 children, two of which preceded her in death, and 7 grandchildren.

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

Monday, November 29, 1943

Mrs. Lillie Cox die in hospital

Mrs. Lillie Belle Cox of 508 East Mulberry Street died at St. Joseph’s hospital, at 8:50 am Sunday.

She was born at Dayton, Ohio Nov. 12, 1874, daughter of Joseph Nad Catherine Reeder, a pioneer Ohio family. She spent her girlhood in Greenville, Ohio, and was married to E.F. Cox of Greenville in 1894. Shortly afterwards they came to Illinois and established a home at Hudson. In 1914, they moved to Bloomington, where the family has resided since.

Surviving are the husband, E.F. Cox, and the following children, Mrs. Dean Dillon, of Normal, Earl R. Cox of Chicago, Mrs. Don Carter, who is at present in Bloomington, Mrs. R.J. Deane of Bloomington, Edward F. Cox of Camp Campbell, Ky. Two daughters, Belle and Marie, preceded her in death.

Also surviving are two sisters and two brothers, Mrs. Addie Shiner of Hudson, Mrs. Van Roseland of Dayton, Ohio, and James and Levi Reeder of Dayton, Ohio, and seven grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held at the Beck memorial home. Burial will be in the Hudson Cemetery. Definite date for the services will be announced later pending the arrival of the son, and a grandson, Roger A. Deane, who is at the army base, Boston, Mass.

Friends may call at the funeral home.

 

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

Thu, Dec 2, 1943

Rites for Mrs. Cox

Rev. Loyal M. Thompson officiated at funeral services held Wednesday for Mrs. Lillie B. Cox at 2 PM. at the Beck funeral home. Mrs. Wayne Balty sang, accompanied by Mrs. T.O. Tiffin at the organ. The pallbearer were Michael Heister, Harley Dillon, Glenn Stevens, Thomas Craig, Earl Baird and Hershel Johnson. Burial was at Hudson.

 

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

Fri, Dec 3, 1943

Cox Funeral Attended by Out of Town People

Out of town people attending the funeral of Mrs. Lillie B. Cox, were Mr. and Mrs. Earl Cox and family, Mr. and Mrs. George Ellington and family of Chicago; James Reeder, Mrs. Van Roseland and Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Hursey, all of Dayton, Ohio; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Shiner of Hudson; Mrs. Edna McAnnelly of Danville; Pfc. Edward Cox, Camp Campbell, Ky.; Pvt. Roger A. Deane, army base, Boston; Pfc. Don Carter of Denver. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon in the Beck memorial home, with the Rev. Loyal M. Thompson officiating. Mrs. Wayne Batty was singer, accompanied by Mrs. T.O. Tiffin, organist.

On Thursday, Dec. 9, 1943, Earl Cox (age 71) was admitted to St. Joseph’s hospital. He was released on Jan 3, 1944.

In the 1944 Dayton Directory, Van and Lizzie were still living at 47 S Williams. Van is still listed as a cook.

On December 11, 1944, Earl Franklin Cox (age 72) died at St. Joseph’s hospital.

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

Tue, Dec 12, 1944

Earl Frank Cox Dies in Hospital

Earl Frank Cox, 1115 Colton Avenue, died at 8:15 am. Monday at St. Joseph’s hospital.

Mr. Cox was born July 5, 1872 in Darke County, Ohio, the son of Jesse and Catherine Cox. He was married to Lily Reeder of Greenville, Ohio, and came to Hudson in 1894 where he engaged in farming. Since 1914, he had made his home in Bloomington.

He was preceded in death by his wife, who died Nov. 28, 1943, and two daughters. Mr. Cox was the last of 14 brothers and sisters and was the last man to operate the old water power mill on the Mackinaw River in the vicinity of Kappa.

Surviving are the following children: Corp. Edward F. Cox, now on the western front in Europe; Earl Cox, Chicago; Mrs. Dean Dillon, Normal; Mrs. R. Deane and Mrs. Don Carter, both of Bloomington; seven grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held at 10 am. Wednesday at the Beck Memorial home. Burial will be in the Hudson cemetery.

 

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

Wed, Dec 13, 1944

Cox Funeral

Funeral services for Earl F. Cox were held at the Beck Memorial home at 10 am. Wednesday with the Rev. Daniel J. Gretzinger officiating. The organist was Mrs. T.O. Tiffin. Henry Charles sang. Pallbearers were Harley Dillon, Charles Shiner, Lyle Swope, Gilbert Boughton, Hershal Johnson and Carroll Shiner. Burial was in the Hudson cemetery.

Otto (age 65) died in 1950. On his death certificate, the cause of death was listed as: syphilis tertiary, meningoencephalitic type, brancho pneumonia.

The Chronicle Tribune, Marion, Indiana, Sunday, 05 Mar 1950, page 17, column 2.

Otto E. Reeder dies at VA Hospital here.

Otto E. Reeder, 64, died at the VA hospital at 10:27 AM Saturday. He had been at the hospital since 1925.

A resident of Richmond, Mr. Reeder had served in the infantry from 1905 to 1908.

Rights will be held at 1:15 PM Monday at the VA Chapel with the Rev. William Reifanyder officiating, and burial will be in the VA cemetery.

Survivors are four sisters, Mrs. Claudine Lawhorn of Richmond, Mrs. Nora Amos of Shelbyville, Mrs. Goldie Matthews of Indianapolis, and Mrs. Pearl Ewry of Dayton, Ohio.

Pearl died in May, 1950.

The Palladium Item and Richmond Sun-Telegram, Richmond, Indiana, Monday, 27 Nov 1950

Mrs. Claudine D. Lawhorn

Mrs. Claudine D. Lawhorn, 51 years old, of 1325 Hunt street, died Sunday evening at the Reid Memorial hospital. Mrs. Lawhorn was born at Dayton, Ohio.

Survivors are two sons, Paul J. Lawhorn, jr., and Cleo B., both of Richmond; three sisters, Mrs. Pearl Ewry of Dayton, Mrs. Nora Amos of Shelbyville and Mrs. Goldie Matthews of Indianapolis, and four grandchildren.

Funeral services for Mrs. Lawhorn will be held Tuesday morning at 10:30 a.m. at the Stegall-Berheide funeral home. Burial will be in Earlham cemetery. Friends may call Monday evening.

In the 1950 Dayton Directory, Van (age unknown) and Lizzie (age 77) had moved to 818 Burwood Avenue. In the 1951-56 directories, Van is listed as Otto V with Lizzie and they have moved to 311 Calumet Lane. After 1956, neither is listed again.

James Gardner Reeder (age 71) died in 1950.

The Journal Herald, Monday, September 4, 1950, page 5.

James G. Reeder

Services for James G. Reeder, 71, of 1235 Wayne Avenue, who died at 9:35 a.m. Saturday at St. Elizabeth Hospital, will be conducted at 2 p.m. tomorrow at Morris Sons funeral home, 1809 East Third street, with Rev. Harmon F. Ray officiating. Burial, Woodland Cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home after noon today. A native of Darke County, Mr. Reeder had lived in Dayton 50 years and was a machinist. Survivors include his wife, Annis D., four sons, James D. Jr., Clifford, John Calvin, and Paul, all of Dayton; two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Roseland of Dayton, and Mrs. Adeline Johnson, Hudson, Ill., and two grandchildren.

Claudine (age 51) died in November 1950.

The Palladium Item and Richmond Sun-Telegram, Richmond, Indiana, Monday, 27 Nov 1950, page 10, column 4.

Mrs. Claudine D Lawhorn

Mrs. Claudine the Lawhorn, 51 years old, of 1325 Hunt St., died Sunday evening at the Reid Memorial Hospital. Mrs. Lawhorn was born at Dayton, Ohio.

Survivors are two sons, Paul J Lawhorn Jr., and Cleo B, both of Richmond; three sisters, Mrs. Perl Ewry of Dayton, Mrs. Nora Amos of Shelbyville, and Mrs. Goldie Matthews at Indianapolis, and four grandchildren.

Funeral services for Mrs. Lawhorn will be held Tuesday morning at 10:30 AM at the Stegall-Herheide funeral home. Burial will be in Earlham Cemetery. Friends may call Monday evening.

Pearl (age 47) died in December 1951.

Dayton Daily News, Dayton, Ohio, Wednesday. 17 Dec 1951, page 27.

Mrs. Pearl Ewry

Services for Mrs. Pearl Ewry, 46, of R.R.2 (Cemetery Drive) who died Saturday at her residence after a brief illness, will be conducted at 1 PM Wednesday at the Morris Sons funeral home, 1809 E. 3rd St., by the Rev. Sheldon T Harbach. Burial will be in the Beavertown Cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home after 4 PM Tuesday.

Charles Shiner (age 79), Addie’s husband, died in 1956. His estate was valued at $2000 (equal to $13,500 in 2014).

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

Thu, May 17, 1956

Charles Shiner

HUDSON — Charles Shiner, 79, died at 5:28 P.M. Wednesday at St. Joseph’s hospital in Bloomington. He had been a patient there since April 5.

He was taken to the Beck Memorial Home. The funeral will be there at 1:30 p.m. Saturday with the Rev. James Barnett, pastor of the Atlanta Christian Church, officiating. Burial will be in Hudson Cemetery.

Mr. Shiner, a retired carpenter, was born near Hudson Dec 24, 1876, son of Jacob and Dorothy Albaugh Shiner. He married Addie Reeder in Bloomington Sept. 28, 1910.

Surviving are his wife, one sister, Mrs. Emily Baxter, Powhatan, Kansas, and several nieces and nephews.

Paul Lawhorn (age 64), Claudine’s husband, died in 1963.

The Palladium Item and Richmond Sun-Telegram, Richmond, Indiana, Wednesday, 01 May 1963, page 7, column 4.

Paul Lawhorn

Paul Lawhorn, 1359 Boyer St., died Tuesday evening following an extended illness. He was 63 years old.

Mr. Lawhorn was an employee of the Rathskeljer. He was a veteran of World War I and a member of the Eagles Lodge of Richmond.

Survivors include the widow, Hellen; two sons, Paul Junior, of Dayton Ohio and Cleo of Centerville; three stepsons, Joseph Phillips and Richard Phillips both of Richmond, and airman first class William Phillips, Westover Air Force Base, Massachusetts; two brothers, Charles Richmond and Harley of Shelbyville; 13 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Services for Mr. Lawhorn will be held Friday at 1:30 PM at the Stegall-Berheide-Orr funeral home. Rev. George Goris will officiate. Burial will be in Earlham Cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home Thursday after 2 PM.

Addie (Malinda) Reeder (age 83) died in 1966.

The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois

Wed, Dec 21, 1966

Mrs. Addie Shiner

HUDSON — Mrs. Addie M. Shiner, 83, former Hudson town clerk and treasurer, died at 3:45 p.m. Tuesday at Brokaw Hospital in Normal.

Her funeral will be at 2:30 p.m. Thursday at the Beck Memorial Home in Bloomington, with he Rev. Merlin Stratton officiating. Burial will be in Hudson Cemetery.

Friends my call at the memorial home this evening.

She was born at Greenville, Ohio, Sept. 10, 1883, a daughter of Joseph and Catherine Condon Reeder. She was married to Charles Shiner Sept. 29, 1910, at Bloomington.

Her only survivors are nieces and nephews.

She was a member of the Hudson Christian Church.

The story continues in Goldie Reeder’s post.